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73 Plymouth Fury

  
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73 Plymouth Fury

 
Keller Keller
New User | Posts: 1 | Joined: 07/13
Posted: 07/27/13
09:55 AM

Hello i have a plymouth fury i am starting resturation on soon, and there is some data i would like to have some help with.  Laugh

Ive been told that there are not many of this model, it is a 1973 plymouth fury limo and i dont know what submodel it is,? and if its a furyIII or ? And then i would like to know if there is somewhere tou can search on who has owned a car in the us.?

This is one just like it:
Plymouth Fury Limo 1969 01

Hope you can help

Thank you

Mark Keller  

waynep712222 waynep712222
User | Posts: 127 | Joined: 04/13
Posted: 07/28/13
12:21 PM

upload some pictures to photobucket... post the image links here..

check out any badges on the car.. might identify the coach builder.. either crown or others.

could have been created by Hess and  Eisenhardt, for various service functions..

you might want to carefully check it for odd things.. like being bullet proof.. you would notice the difference.. as the THICK glass would be a sure thing..


this is from the wiki imperial site

Post Ghia Imperial limousines (1966–1983)[edit]

While the "Crown Imperial" limousines ended in 1965, Imperial limousines continued to be made by other coach builders. After the last ten Ghia built Crown Imperials were completed, Ghia sold its tooling to Barreiros Coachbuilders of Spain. Barreiros built ten limousines, much like those built by Ghia and, similar to the last ten built by Ghia, built 1965s with 1966 exterior styling, but with two inches longer wheelbase. Build quality was poor by comparison, with the cars famous for having a wiring harness made from wires of the same color.

Between 1967 and 1971 a total of 27 Imperial limousines were produced by Stageway Coachbuilders (ASC) of Fort Smith, Arkansas on a 163.0 in (4,140 mm) wheelbase, and were justifiably advertised as the largest luxury automobiles in the world. Two 1972 models with 1973 grills were built by the Hess and Eisenhardt Company of Fairfield, Indiana for the United States Secret Service and were used by Presidents Nixon, Ford, Carter, and Reagan on his swearing-in day. One 1974 model Imperial was produced into a limo also by ASC. The final Imperial limousines were 1981-83 bodied cars, two of which were stretched 24-inch (610 mm) and five were lengthened 36-inch (910 mm).